Patient-Family Engagement |Language of Caring - Part 3
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Patient-Family Engagement

February 24, 2015
How Choosing Our Words Carefully Can Drive Change in Health Care
Wendy Leebov, Ed.D.
Partner & Founder, Language of Caring, LLC

Those of us intent on strengthening the patient, family and co-worker experience need to heighten our self-consciousness about the words we use and intentionally choose words that move us in the direction we want.  It’s a matter of aligning our language with our health care system of the future, not the past.

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February 11, 2015
It’s No Fad! Mindfulness is a Game-Changer for the Patient and Staff Experience
Wendy Leebov, Ed.D.
Partner & Founder, Language of Caring, LLC

If I could advance only ONE communication skill to create breakthroughs in the patient experience and staff experience, it would be mindfulness.  This highly learnable skill involves controlling your attention so the person on the receiving end feels like the center of your universe during the precious moments you have with them. And it will never go out of style!

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January 14, 2015
Where is the Patient in the Patient Experience?
Dorothy Sisneros, M.S., M.B.A.
Partner & SVP, Client Services, Language of Caring, LLC

With so much focus on the impact every one of us has on the patient and family experience, we may inadvertently err in thinking that ‘we are the patient experience’.  We might think we create the patient experience, but the patient’s preferences, goals and expectations need to drive the experience and they need to drive us to do our part in creating it.

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December 16, 2014
When Patient Engagement Meets with Patient Ambivalence
Jill Golde, M.S.
Partner & SVP, Market Development, Language of Caring, LLC

On one hand, we’re telling providers to engage their patients, to share decision-making with them. And we’re telling patients to get more involved in their own care.  On the other hand, I’ll bet that, as a patient, I’m not alone in my ambivalence about the prospect of taking (what I fear is) full responsibility for my own care.

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